Hanne Darboven: Künstlicher Marmor, Kirche Neuenfelde, Harburg Elbe Nord

Hanne Darboven: Künstlicher Marmor, Kirche Neuenfelde, Harburg Elbe Nord

Hanne Darboven: Künstlicher Marmor, Kirche Neuenfelde, Harburg Elbe Nord, 1998. Photo: Schellmann Art, Munich.

Three grano lithographs, printed in six colors on Rives rag paper
each print 50 x 40 cm
Edition: 60
each signed, numbered

Hanne Darboven’s oeuvre is characterized by rhythm and time, a unity that is both abstract and concrete, just like her own work. Trained as a pianist and driven by the conviction that time is the essence of our existence, her pronounced sense of tempo, structure, and repetition determines her thousands of serial works on often typewriter paper: sensitively handwritten mathematical calculations and numbers, codes, compositions based on calendar days, diagrams, text sequences, and notes—methodically patterned, rastered, and combined with hues, images, and objects and arranged in installations.

The annual edition of the Kölnischer Kunstverein, a three-part lithography series, traces stations of Darboven’s life in Hamburg. To the images of artificial marble in three different shades of color are added hand-written locations. Darboven used this visualization and sorting of information, documents, and data according to self-imposed rules not only as a far-reaching record of historical events from politics, culture and society, but also of her own biography. Similar to the work of a historiographer, the broad range of topics and the richness of her photographic material give her work the appearance of a visual encyclopedia of (personal) contemporary history.

Hanne Darboven (*1941 in Munich, died 2009 in Hamburg-Harburg) studied at the University of Fine Arts in Hamburg until 1965 and was represented for the first time with a solo presentation in 1967 at the Galerie Konrad Fischer in Düsseldorf. Numerous further solo exhibitions followed, including 1970 at the Museum of Modern Art and 1971 at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. Hanne Darboven participated in the Documenta in Kassel in 1972, 1977, 1982 and 2002 and represented Germany at the Biennale di Venezia in 1982. The Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn and the Haus der Kunst in Munich jointly dedicated a parallel retrospective to the artist in 2015 to honor her outstanding practice. Her works can be found in numerous renowned international collections and museums of modern art.

€ 1.000,00
Hanne Darboven: Künstlicher Marmor, Kirche Neuenfelde, Harburg Elbe Nord, 1998. Photo: Schellmann Art, Munich.